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Monday, 23 October 2017

Dry Skin Care

Stop Using Hot Water 

               I’m the first to admit that there’s nothing better than a hot shower or bath. However, while the rest of the body feels great, the heat can cause your skin to dry. Hot water can strip your body of its natural oils that act as a barrier on your skin. This barrier is super important, because it helps trap much needed moisture that keeps your skin stay hydrated, soft and smooth. If you can, avoid a hot shower and take a nice warm one instead. And while we all love to linger in the tub, it’s best to get in and out quickly to avoid the drying of our skin. Limit yourself to 5 to 10 minutes maximum. When you get out of the shower, gently pat your skin dry, don’t rub, and immediately apply your facial and body moisturizers.


Be gentle


      When we cleanse our skin, sometimes we get a little rough. It’s as if we literally want to scrub our bodies clean. When it comes to dry skin, you need to take it easy and gently cleanse. Don’t exfoliate or scrub your skin too hard, because it can irritate and thicken your skin—not a good thing. It’s important to use gentle cleansers as well. Anything with harsh detergents can leave your skin feeling extra dry and irritated. Choose a cleanser that contains natural ingredients like Aloe vera, which will help soothe and soften the skin. Lastly, remember to rinse clean. You want to remove all traces of soap and cleanser from your body, especially your face. Lingering product can cause drying and itching.



Just for the men


          
            For all of the guys out there who have dry skin, this one is for you. Shaving your face can definitely irritate dry skin. Each time you scrape a razor across your skin you’re not only removing unwanted hair, you’re also removing your natural oils. It’s important to shave during or immediately after your shower. This will allow your facial hair to become softer and more pliable, which ultimately will make shaving easier for you. Make sure your razor is sharp so you can avoid irritation. Always use a shaving cream or gel, preferably one with moisturizing properties. Avoid alcohol-based aftershaves and toners at all costs, as they will only contribute to further dryness. Choose a good facial toner as a healthier alternative to aftershave.


Moisturize

        If your skin is dry and uncomfortable, adding moisture is very important. Again, apply your moisturizers immediately after your bath or shower while your skin is still damp. Be sure to use a daytime product that contains SPF and a richer, replenishing night cream at bedtime. A hydrating eye cream is perfect for the delicate skin around the eyes. An all-over body lotion or gel will help with dryness and itchiness everywhere else on the body. The legs, arms, back, hands, and everywhere else can get dry without proper moisturizing. If you suffer from dry hands, be sure to apply a nice hand and body lotion every time you wash your hands. When water evaporates from your skin, it can draw even more moisture out of your skin. A good moisturizing cream or lotion is really your best defense against dry skin.

Stay hydrated
           Now that we’ve discussed being moisturized on the outside, remember it’s also important to moisturize on the inside. Drinking water throughout the day keeps your body and skin hydrated.



Saturday, 14 October 2017

Good Skin Care Tips

Protect yourself with tips and tricks to keep your skin fresh and healthy


Stay Hydrated
               Our bodies tend to lose a fair amount of moisture during the spring and summer months. As such, it’s important to regularly replenish the water reserves. Keep the H2O handy to keep your skin moisturized and soft throughout the season.

              If at all possible, stay indoors between the hours of 11am and 3pm – when the sun’s rays are strongest. Regardless, it’s important not to skimp on the sunscreen – a minimum of 30 minutes before heading out. If you’re lounging at the pool, make sure to touch it up again to ensure you’re protected properly.
Use A Toner
           Keep your skin cool and pores closed with the aid of a toner.
Use A Daily Moisturizer
                    Far too many people do not adhere to a moisturizing routine. At United Pharmacy, our dermatology management specialists offer clients an array of options to suit their individual skin type needs. Make sure to use daily to ensure proper skin hydration.

Avoid Carbonated Beverages
                       There’s nothing wrong with the occasional splurge. A beer or soda can appear divine on a hot summer afternoon. However, it’s important to remember the content of your beverage choices and the effect they have on your skin. Sugar and the diuretics (alcohol and caffeine) will actually dehydrate your body. Opt instead for a water, fresh fruit juice, or coconut water to satisfy your thirst and maintain adequate hydration levels.



Thursday, 5 October 2017

Tips for Preventing Acne

Keep your face clean:

Whether or not you have acne, it's important to wash your face twice daily to remove impurities, dead skin cells, and extra oil from your skin's surface. Washing more often than twice daily is not necessarily better; it may do more harm than good. Use warm, not hot, water and a mild facial cleanser. Using a harsh soap (like deodorant body soap) can hurt the already inflamed skin and cause more irritation.
Avoid scrubbing your skin harshly with a washcloth, an exfoliating glove, or loofah (a coarse-textured sponge). Gently wash it with  a very soft cloth or your hands. Always rinse well, and then dry your face with a clean towel. (Toss the towel in the laundry hamper, as dirty towels spread bacteria.) Also, use the washcloth only once.
Moisturize:
Many acne products contain ingredients that dry the skin, so always use a moisturizer that minimizes dryness and skin peeling. Look for "noncomedogenic" on the label, which means it should not cause acne. There are moisturizers made for oily, dry, or combination skin.
Try an over-the-counter acne product:
These acne products don't need a prescription. Most of them have ingredients such as benzoyl peroxidesalicylic acid, glycolic acid, or lactic acid, which curb bacteria and dry your skin. They may cause drying or peeling so start with a small amount at first. Then you can adjust how much you use and how often. Another option is a new OTC topical retinoid gel. It works to actually keep the acne from forming. Use these products with caution if you have sensitive skin.
Use makeup sparingly:
During a breakout, avoid wearing foundation, powder, or blush. If you do wear makeup, wash it off at the end of the day. If possible, choose oil-free cosmetics without added dyes and chemicals. Choose makeup that is labeled as "noncomedogenic," meaning it should not cause acne. Read the ingredients list on the product label before buying.
Watch what you put on your hair:
Avoid using fragrances, oils, pomades, or gels on your hair. If they get on your face, they can block your skin's pores and irritate your skin. Use a gentle shampoo and conditioner. Oily hair can add to the oil on your face, so wash your hair often, especially if you're breaking out. Got long hair? Keep it pulled away from your face.
Keep your hands off your face:
Avoid touching your face or propping your cheek or chin on your hands. Not only can you spread bacteria, you can also irritate the already inflamed facial skin. Never pick or pop pimples with your fingers, as it can lead to infection and scarring.
Stay out of the sun:
The sun's ultraviolet rays can increase inflammation and redness, and can cause post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (dark discoloration). Some acne medications may make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, and a broad-brimmed hat. Whether you have pimples or not, always apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher at least 20 minutes before sun exposure. Look for "noncomedogenic" on the sunscreen label to make new pimples less likely. Read the ingredients on the product label to know what you're putting on your skin.
Feed your skin:
Most experts agree that certain foods, like chocolate, don't cause pimples. Still, it makes sense to avoid greasy food and junk food and add more fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains to your diet. Dairy products and foods high in processed sugar may trigger acne. Avoid these.
Exercise daily:
Regular exercise is good for your whole body, including your skin. When you exercise, avoid wearing clothing or using exercise equipment that rubs your skin and may cause irritation. Shower or bathe right after exercise.
Chill:
Some studies link stress with the severity of pimples or acne. Ask yourself what's making you feel stressed. Then look for solutions.
When in doubt, check with a dermatologist to see if you need more treatment to prevent or stop acne.
              

Sunday, 1 October 2017

Women Skin care tips

Use Natural Products:

                  Many skin care products are packed with chemicals and heavily processed ingredients. You can often get better results with natural skin care products that contain herbs, or even coconut oil or olive oil. The same ingredients that can be healthy in the kitchen can also help you achieve healthier skin.

Give Your Skin the Nutrition it Needs:

                          our skin has unique nutritional needs. Beyond the usual advice of eating a balanced diet with plenty of vegetables, there are several specific foods that can help you to achieve naturally radiant skin. Some of my favorites include dark chocolate (over 70% cacao), coconut oil and red bell peppers. See the full list of foods in my skin care over 60 nutrition article.
Instead of trying to look “younger,” women over 60 can look great and feel better by accepting who we are and by living life as the vibrant, comfortable, and strong people that we are.

Don’t Soak Too Long in the Tub:

                       A hot bath can be a great way to relax – but if you spend too long in the bathtub, you might be drying out your skin. If you love a long and leisurely bath, use some lovely bath oil or lather on some body moisturizer when you get out of the bath when you skin is still a little damp.

Stop Smoking:

             Aside from all the other health benefits of giving up smoking, if you are a smoker, you probably have more wrinkles than other people your same age who do not smoke. Try to stop. If you need help to quit smoking, this article has some excellent resources.

Wash Your Face Before Sleep:

                     Dry skin is one of the most common challenges for women over 60, because people’s skin tends to become drier as we lose oil glands when we get older. One of the best ways to reduce dry skin is to wash your face every night before bed – but don’t use soap, as soap will pull away the natural oils from your skin that are needed to keep your skin healthy. Drink lots of water as well!

Stay Out of the Sun:

                Sun damage is one of the leading causes of wrinkled, spotted skin. Try to limit your sun exposure, wear hats and use sunblock. A lot of sun damage doesn’t become fully apparent until later in life – but it’s never “too late” to make a difference in the health of your skin by reducing your sun exposure. Using sunblock and avoiding excessive sun can also reduce your risk of skin cancer.
Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that it is “too late” to start caring about sunblock. If you are in your 60s, you probably have 20-30 more years on this amazing planet. That’s a long time for the decisions that you make not to come back to haunt you!